A Black Scholar Awarded the National Humanities Medal

Kwame Anthony Appiah, the Laurence S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University, received the National Humanities Medal at a White House ceremony earlier this week. The citation read at the ceremony stated the Professor Appiah was awarded the medal “for seeking eternal truths in the contemporary world. His books and essays within and beyond his academic discipline have shed moral and intellectual light on the individual in an era of globalization and evolving group identities.”

Professor Appiah is a native of Ghana and earned a Ph.D. at Cambridge University. Before coming to Princeton in 2002, he taught at Harvard University. He has been a member of the board of trustees of Facing History and Ourselves since 1993. He is also president of the PEN American Center.

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