New Report Looks to Explain the Racial Gap in College Graduation Rates

A new report from the American Council on Education examines why Black and Hispanic students have significantly lower rates of degree attainment than other students at U.S. colleges and universities.

“The reality is that many African American and Hispanic students must endure challenges and obstacles even before college that can be detrimental to their chances of matriculating and graduating,” said Kim Bobby, director of ACE’s Inclusive Excellence Group. “As we strive to reach higher attainment rates, these inequities present a great challenge to the higher education community.”

The new report, The Education Gap: Understanding African American and Hispanic Attainment Disparities in Higher Education, can be purchased online here for $25.00

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1 COMMENT

  1. The completion of graduate school, in particular the doctoral degree, is even more challenging for black people because in many fields (e.g., my field of sociology) there is an abysmal level of psychological, emotional support – even as the monetary support is usually more than enough.

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