Recent Books That May Be of Interest to African American Scholars

books-pileThe Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view. The opinions expressed in these books do not necessarily reflect the views of the editorial board of JBHE. Here are the latest selections.

Click on any of the titles for more information or to purchase through Amazon.com.


Exploring Race in Predominantly White Classrooms:
Scholars of Color Reflect

edited by George Yancy and Maria del Guadalupe Davidson
(Routledge)


From Storefront to Monument:
Tracing the Public History of the Black Museum Movement

by Andrea A. Burns
(University of Massachusetts Press)

Hidden History:
African American Cemeteries in Central Virginia

by Lynn Rainville
(University of Virginia Press)

Malcolm X at Oxford Union: Racial Politics in a Global Era
by Saladin Ambar
(Oxford University Press)

Shrill Hurrahs:
Women, Gender, and Racial Violence in South Carolina, 1865-1900

by Kate Cote Gillin
(University of South Carolina Press)

Slaves and Englishmen:
Human Bondage in the Early Modern Atlantic World

by Michael Guasco
(University of Pennsylvania Press)

The South Carolina Roots of African American Thought:
A Reader

by Rhondda Robinson Thomas and Susanna Ashton
(University of South Carolina Press)

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