Higher Education Gifts or Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

The University of Michigan has received a nearly $1 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to launch the Michigan Maternity Care Traineeship Program with Birth Detroit, a Black-led nonprofit community birthing center. The grant will provide scholarships to students in the university’s nurse-midwifery program, aiming to better address the disparities facing maternity care that exist in minority communities.

The College of Education at historically Black North Carolina A&T State University has received a $1.1 million grant from the United States Department of Education. The grant will support the university in expanding and providing additional opportunities for its special education program.

Historically Black Florida A&M University has received a $3 million grant from the United States Department of Education to develop a geospatial-artificial intelligence enhanced curriculum for minority-serving institutions. The project will be conducted in partnership with two other historically Black universities, Kentucky State University and Clark Atlanta University.

The University of California Davis has been awarded a three-year, $3 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The new funds will support research into the causes, complexities, and potential solutions to guns in Black and Brown communities. The research will be conducted by the Black & Brown Collective, a multidisciplinary network of several institutions.

The City University of New York has received a $5 million grant from the Mellon Foundation to expand the university’s Black, Race, and Ethnic Studies Initiative. The funds will go towards establishing a new degree program, creating scholarships for Ph.D. students, and hiring new faculty members

Tennessee State University, a historically Black institution in Nashville, has received a $4.9 million grant as part of the federal grant program, New Infrastructure, Technology, and Education for HBCU Excellence (IGNITE). The university will use its new funds to repair on-campus infrastructure, as well as support the construction of a new biomedical research center.

The food pantry and career closet at historically Black Winston-Salem State University has received a $145,000 donation from Allegacy Federal Credit Union. The gift will go towards renovating a new Student Resource Center and supporting the center’s resources. The center will centralize resources to support students with childcare, basic needs, food and housing assistance, transportation, and healthcare.

Philanthropist Rose Ellen Greene has donated $170,000 to historically Black Florida Memorial University in support of its ROAR marching band. The gift will be used to purchase new uniforms for the band.

Historically Black Fayetteville State University in North Carolina has received a $1 million grant from the National Institute for Student Success. The grant will help the university increase its enrollment, retention, and graduation rates through various initiatives such as new staff dedicated to student enrollment and retention assistance, paid internships, and hiring more university instructors.

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