Tag: Rice University

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

The Doerr Institute for New Leaders at Rice University Names Bernard Banks as Its New Director

Dr. Banks comes to Rice from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, where he has been serving as associate dean for leadership development and inclusion and clinical professor of management and organizations. Earlier, he was chair of the department of behavioral sciences and leadership at the U.S. Military Academy.

Sherwin K. Bryant to Lead the Center for African and African American Studies at Rice University

Dr. Bryant currently serves as an associate professor of Black studies and history at Northwestern University. He is the former director of Northwestern’s Center for African American History.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

New Administrative Duties in Higher Education for Six African Americans

Taking on new roles are Brandon A. Logan at Grambling State University in Louisiana, Melinda Spaulding Chevalier at Rice University in Houston, Jeremy Carter at Philander Smith University in Little Rock, Arkansas, Holly Rachel at Fisk University in Nashville, Marriel Hardy at Talladega College in Alabama, and Kenneth Elvis Jones at Wilberforce University in Ohio.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Rice University Enhances Its Partnership With Historically Black Texas Southern University

Rice University and historically Black Texas Southern University - both in Houston - have announced a partnership to share resources, expertise, and best practices to build stronger bridges between the institutions and the community.

Ruth Simmons to Take on New Role as Senior Adviser to the President of Harvard University

Ruth Simmons, who recently stepped down as president of Prairie View A&M University in Texas, will advise the president of Harvard on efforts to support the recommendations of the Presidential Committee on Harvard & the Legacy of Slavery. Her work will focus on engaging in meaningful and enduring partnerships with the nation’s HBCUs.

Rice University to Relocate Statue of Its White Supremacist Founder

The board of trustees of Rice University has decided the statue of William Marsh Rice will no longer be at the center of the Academic Quadrangle and will be presented with historical context and information about the university’s founder, including his ownership of enslaved people.

How Teacher Development Initiatives Can Increase Black Students’ Pursuit of STEM Degrees

A new study led by scholars at Rice University in Houston, Texas, found that when middle and high school teachers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pursue continuing professional development, their students benefit. The effect was particularly evident for Black girls.

Seven African Americans Who Have Been Named to Administrative Roles in Higher Education

Taking on new administrative duties are Aaron J. Hart at Virginia Commonwealth University, Shawn Bake at Harris-Stowe State University in St. Louis, Carmen W. Harper at Fayetteville State University, Monique Carroll at Chicago State University, Lisa Lee at Rice University in Houston, Earl Holland Jr. at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Toniette Haynes Robinson at Dallas College.

Exposure to Lead-Based Paint Is Still Impacting the Racial Gap in Educational Progress

Lead-based paint was banned in the United States in 1978. But people who live in the nation's older housing stock - primarily those in impoverished urban areas still are at high risk of exposure to lead-based paint. Studies have shown that exposure to lead can have a significant negative impact on the cognitive abilities of young children.

Young White Adults Increasingly Believe That Anti-Black Racism Is a Thing of the Past

A new study led by Tony Brown, a professor of sociology at Rice University in Houston, Texas, finds a rise in racial apathy — in other words, not caring about racial inequality — among young White adults.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Reginald DesRoches Will Be the Eighth President of Rice University in Houston

The will of oil tycoon William Marsh Rice stipulated that only White students would be allowed to enroll at the university bearing his name. From its founding in 1912 to 1965, no Black student was permitted to enroll at Rice University. Next summer, the university will install its first Black president.

Three African American Scholars Who Have Retired from High-Level University Positions

Retiring after long careers in higher education are Martha Lue Stewart, at the University of Central Florida, Rahim Reed at the University of California, Davis, and Roland Smith at Rice University in Houston, Texas.

Charles Robinson Has Been Named Interim Chancellor of the University of Arkansas

Dr. Robinson has been serving as provost and executive vice chancellor for academic and student affairs. He was named provost last year and has served as vice chancellor of student affairs since 2015. Dr. Robinson’s time at the University of Arkansas spans more than 20 years, beginning as an assistant professor of history.

How Did Racial Segregation in the Armed Forces Impact Battlefield Mortality?

On July 26, 1948, President Harry S Truman issued Executive Order 9981 which abolished racial discrimination in the United States Armed Forces. But as was the case with schools several years later, desegregation moved at a snail's pace. During the first half of the Korean War, most units remained racially segregated.

Four African Americans Who Have Been Hired to Diversity Posts at Colleges and Universities

Taking on new roles as diversity officers are Pierre Morton at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, New Hampshire, Harris Akinloye at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California, Keesha Burke-Henderson at Randolph College in Lynchburg, Virginia, Mary J. Wardell-Ghirarduzzi at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, and Constance Porter at Rice University in Houston.

Consortium of Prestigious Academic Institutions to Collaborate on SlaveVoyages.org

Emory University in Atlanta will now bring in a group of partners to help it maintain and enhance its SlaveVoyages.org project. The website documents nearly 50,000 transatlantic passages of slave ships between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Gilda Barabino Selected to Lead the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Gilda Barabino is the president of the Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Massachusetts. She was the first African American woman admitted to the graduate program in chemical engineering at Rice University. In 1986, she was the fifth African American woman in the nation to obtain a doctorate in chemical engineering.

Four Houston-Area Universities Form a Black Studies Consortium

Two historically Black educational institutions - Texas Southern University and Prairie View A&M University - have partnered with Rice University and the University of Houston to form the Southeastern Texas African and African American Studies Consortium.

Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

How Societal Inequality and Racism Impacts Health Disparities in the United States

Lead author Quianta Moore, a fellow in child health of the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston, Texas, states that "not only are we not all equally healthy, but we do not all have an equal opportunity to be healthy."

In Memoriam: Jacqueline Elizabeth McCauley, 1947-2020

In 1965, Jackie McCauley enrolled at Rice University along with Charles Edwards Freeman. They were the first African American undergraduate students at the university. She was the first black high school student in Texas to be named a National Merit Scholar.

Six Black Scholars Taking on New Assignments in Higher Education

Appointed to new posts are Jeffrey Q. McCune, Jr. at the University of Rochester, Hakeem Tijani at Morgan State University, LeRhonda S. Manigault-Bryant at Williams College, Alexis Smith Washington at Oklahoma State University, Bryan Washington at Rice University, and Tonya Perry of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Two Prestigious Universities Bestow Honors on African American Scholars

Stanford University has named a theater on campus in honor of Harry Elam Jr., who taught at Stanford for 30 years before becoming president of Occidental College in Los Angeles. Rice University in Houston has named a grove after Rev. William A. Lawson a civil rights leader and former professor at Texas Southern University.

A Trio of African American Scholars Receive Notable Honors or Awards

The honorees are Milton Morris, the director of Environmental Health Science at Benedict College in South Carolina, Stephanie Luster-Teasley, a professor of engineering at North Carolina A&T State University, and Alexander Byrd, associate dean of humanities and associate professor of history at Rice University in Houston.

New Administrative Positions in Higher Education for Three African Americans

Erika  K. Davis was named vice president for enrollment management at Cedar Crest College in Pennsylvania. Darvis Griffin is assistant chief information officer at Texas A&M University and Ronica Smucker has been named associate vice president of development at Rice University in Houston.

Gilda Barabino Will Be the Next President of the Olin College of Engineering

A respected researcher in the study of sickle cell disease, Dr. Barabino became dean of the Grove School of Engineering at the City College of New York in 2013. She also serves as the Daniel and Frances Berg Professor at City College.

How Racism Impacts African Americans’ Decisions to Seek Self-Employment

Two sociologists at Rice University in Houston, Texas, found that working Black adults with “racial capital,” or high awareness of the systemic nature of racism, were seven times more likely to pursue self-employment than those with low awareness.

The First African American Provost at Rice University in Houston, Texas

Since 2017, Reginald DesRoches has been the William and Stephanie Sick Dean of Engineering at Rice University. Previously, he served as chair of the School of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Rice University Lecturer Wins the 2019 Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence

The award has been given out for the past 13 years by Baton Rouge Area Foundation. It recognizes the work of African American fiction writers and honors the legacy of author Ernest J. Gaines who died last month.

Academic Study Finds Blacks More Likely Than Whites to Support Teaching Creationism in Schools

In a survey of nearly 10,000 participants, the authors found that a higher percentage of Black (58 percent) and Latino Americans (57 percent) compared to Whites (44 percent) support teaching creationism in the classroom instead of (but not alongside) evolution.

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