UCLA Scientists Develop Promising New Treatment for Sickle-Cell Disease

ucla_logoResearchers at the University of California at Los Angeles have developed a new procedure the uses stem cells from the bone marrow of patients with sickle-cell disease to treat the disease. The researchers are planning to conduct clinical trials of the new procedure early next year.

Sickle cell disease causes the body to produce red blood cells that resemble the curved blade of a sickle. These cells hinder blood flow and reduce oxygen flow to the body.

This potential new treatment for sickle-cell disease is of particular interest to the African American community. While people of any race can have the sickle-cell trait, the disease is far more common among African Americans than it is among Whites. About one in every 400 African Americans is born with the sickle-cell trait.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Get the JBHE Weekly Bulletin

Receive our weekly email newsletter delivered to your inbox

Latest News

Donald Comer Named Interim President of Lane College in Tennessee

Dr. Comer has extensive experience as an advocate for HBCUs and African American business education serving on the board of trustees for Stillman College and LeMoyne-Owen College. He will assume his new duties on August 1.

Racial Disparities Found Among Veterans’ Experiences With VA-Funded Community Care

"Community care" provides veterans with an streamlined option to receive VA-funded healthcare through non-VA providers. A new study has found Black Americans are more likely to report negative experiences with community care providers and administrators.

Jeffrey Norfleet Is the New Leader of Shorter College in Arkansas

Dr. Norfleet has been serving as Shorter College's provost and vice president. He has an extensive background in higher education, serving in both academic and administrative capacities.

Study Finds Increase in School Segregation Linked to Racial Health Disparities Among Black Americans

According to a new study from Tufts University, U.S. counties with particularly high levels of school segregation experience significant health disparities in life expectancy, early mortality, homicides, and teen births among Black Americans.
spot_img

Featured Jobs