Two African American Giants of Higher Education to Have Highways Named in Their Honor

Two African American icons of higher education in North Carolina will be recognized by having sections of highways in the state named in their honor. The outgoing secretary of the department of transportation in North Carolina set in motion a plan to have stretches of interstate highways in North Carolina named for Julius L. Chambers and John Hope Franklin.

Julius L. Chambers, who died in 2013, was the former chancellor of North Carolina Central University and the former director-counsel and president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. Chambers was a summa cum laude graduate of what is now North Carolina Central University. He held a master’s degree in history and a law degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he graduated first in his class and was editor of the law review. He later earned a master’s degree in law from Columbia.

John Hope Franklin, who died in 2009, was the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History at Duke University and one of the most prolific and respected historians of the twentieth century. Dr. Franklin was a graduate of Fisk University in Nashville and earned master’s and doctoral degrees at Harvard University. Over the course of a long academic career, Professor Franklin taught at North Carolina Central University, Howard University in Washington, D.C., and Brooklyn College in New York. In 1964 Franklin was hired to the faculty at the University of Chicago. He remained there for 16 years before accepting a position at Duke. He later spent seven years on the faculty of Duke Law School. He retired from teaching in 1992.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Get the JBHE Weekly Bulletin

Receive our weekly email newsletter delivered to your inbox

Latest News

Three African Americans Appointed to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Roles in Higher Education

The appointments to diversity positions are Tamara Clegg at the University of Maryland, Andrew Alvez at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, and Kendriana Price at the University of Kentucky.

Study Finds Women of Color Author a Disproportionate Share of Banned Books in American Schools

In the 2021-2022 academic year, school and libraries across the country experienced a significant spike in book bans. A new study has found a disproportionate share of these banned books are written by women of color and include characters from diverse backgrounds.

Christopher Davis Appointed President of LeMoyne-Owen College in Memphis

Dr. Davis was appointed interim president of LeMoyne-Owen College last summer. Over the past year, he has led the college through a rebranding initiative, an increase in athletic programming, and improvements to campus infrastructure.

Study Reveals Racial Disparities in Use of Social Security Disability Insurance

According to the report, Black Americans are 1.5 to 2 times more likely to receive Social Security Disability Insurance, and spend roughly 40 percent more on medical care than White Americans.

Featured Jobs