New Scholarship Program at Indiana University School of Law Honors Julian Bond

The Mauer School of Law at Indiana University in Bloomington has entered into a partnership with the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, to create the Julian Bond Law Scholars program. Bond, the noted civil rights leader, legislator, NAACP chair,  and long-time faculty member at the University of Virginia who died in 2015, was the co-founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Each year the program will provide one Julian Bond Law Scholar with a scholarship equal to a minimum of 50 percent and up to a maximum of 100 percent of tuition. In addition, the scholarship recipients will be offered a summer externship upon completion of their first year of law school, with a $4,000 stipend to cover living expenses; and a research assistantship during their second or third year with a law school faculty member.

“The Julian Bond Law Scholars program is a perfect fit for our school because of our significant faculty commitment to research and teaching in the areas of civil rights and social justice,” said Austen L. Parrish, dean of the law school and the James H. Rudy Professor of Law.

H. Timothy Lovelace, an associate professor of law at Indiana University, added, “I’m thrilled that we’ve established the Julian Bond Law Scholars program to honor an American hero and my mentor. The Julian Bond Law Scholars program will provide a new generation of justice-minded students a unique opportunity to connect their personal, scholarly and professional interests in civil rights.”

Dr. Lovelace joined the faculty at Indiana University in 2012. He holds a bachelor’s degree in government, a law degree, a master’s degree, and a Ph.D. in history, all from the University of Virginia.

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