Higher Education Grants or Gifts of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Savannah State University, the historically Black educational institution in Georgia, received a five-year, $950,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health for programs to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups in the biomedical and behavioral sciences.

The School of Nursing at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia, received a four-year, $2.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for programs to support students who want to pursue a nursing career in underserved areas.

Historically Black Hampton University in Virginia received a $200,486 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to fund the university’s Nurse Faculty Loan Program that will provide funds to hire nursing faculty for the 2018-19 academic year.

Emory University in Atlanta received a five-year, $3.7 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the effectiveness of a $140 million World Bank-funded water project in the African nation of Mozambique. The researchers will study how effective new water supplies have been in improving child health.

Tuskegee University, the historically Black educational institution in Alabama, received a $300,000 grant from the Verizon Foundation for programs to increase the number of Black male students who study in technology disciplines. The program brings male middle school students and their teachers to campus for a three-week on-campus program designed to increase interest in technology.

Historically Black Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida, received a three-year, $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a program that will bring nine undergraduate students to campus for an eight-week summer research program in an effort to increase the number of students who pursue graduate degree in STEM fields.

Talladega College, a historically Black educational institution in Alabama, received a $500,000 grant from the state of Alabama, to help in the construction of a new art museum on campus that will showcase the Hale Woodruff Amistad Murals.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Get the JBHE Weekly Bulletin

Receive our weekly email newsletter delivered to your inbox

Latest News

Recent Books of Interest to African American Scholars

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education regularly publishes a list of new books that may be of interest to our readers. The books included are on a wide variety of subjects and present many different points of view.

Online Articles That May Be of Interest to JBHE Readers

Each week, JBHE will provide links to online articles that may be of interest to our readers. Here are this week’s selections.

Higher Education Gifts or Grants of Interest to African Americans

Here is this week’s news of grants or gifts to historically Black colleges and universities or for programs of particular interest to African Americans in higher education.

Three African Americans Appointed to Leadership Positions in Diversity

The three African Americans appointed to diversity positions are Melanie Duckworth at the University of Nevada Reno, Doug Thompson at the University of Notre Dame, and Anthony Jones at Centre College in Kentucky.

Featured Jobs