Elijah Anderson Named Sterling Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Yale

Elijah Anderson has been appointed Sterling Professor of Sociology and of African American Studies at Yale University. The Sterling Professorship is awarded to a tenured faculty member considered one of the best in his or her field and is one of the university’s highest faculty honors.

Professor Anderson has been a faculty member at Yale since 2007. Earlier in his career, he served on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania for more than 30 years. Dr. Anderson is the author of several books including Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City (W.W. Norton, 1999) and The Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life (W.W. Norton, 2011).

Professor Anderson has served on the board of directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He is a past vice-president of the American Sociological Association.

Dr. Anderson holds a bachelor’s degree from Indiana University, a master’s degree from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Congratulations
    Would like to discuss with you the issue and challenge of Sickle Cell Disease during the era of slavery in the United States!

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