Howard University to Receive the 2019 American Historical Association Equity Award

The history department at historically Black Howard Univerity in Washington, D.C., is the recipient of the 2019 American Historical Association (AHA) Equity Award, which support’s the association’s decades-old commitment to diversifying the historical profession. The Equity Award recognizes individuals and institutions that have achieved excellence in recruiting and retaining underrepresented racial and ethnic groups into the historical professions.

The AHA’s Committee on Minority Historians served as the selection committee for the Equity Award, and selected entities with strong records including program building, fundraising initiatives, civic engagement, and enhancement of department and campus culture to promote a supportive environment.

“The department of history is deeply honored that our generations-long efforts to mentor and train historically underrepresented students are being recognized by the most significant historical association in the country – we are both humbled and proud,” says Nikki Taylor, professor and chair of the Howard University department of history. “Our students go on to make indelible impressions with research that illuminates inequality, oppression, and injustice, while also highlighting the courage, perseverance, creativity, and tenacity of humanity. That is our legacy.”

Dr. Taylor is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, where she majored in history. She holds a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in American history from Duke University. Professor Taylor is the author of  Driven Toward Madness: The Fugitive Slave Margaret Garner and Tragedy on the Ohio (Ohio University Press, 2016).

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