Telemedicine Could Be a Major Factor in Eliminating Racial Health Care Disparities

Telemedicine appears to be a key to reducing racial inequities in follow-up care after hospitalization, according to a study conducted during the pandemic by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine of the Univerity of Pennsylvania.

As 2020 progressed and telemedicine became one of the main modes for primary care visits, attendance or “show” rates at follow-up appointments after hospitalization climbed among Black patients from 52 to 70 percent. This was comparable to White patients, whose visit completion rates at primary care follow-up appointments were 67 percent by the middle of 2020. The boost the researchers documented effectively eliminated the historical racial gap in show rates to follow-up appointments.

“We do have data that there are racial inequities in geographic access to primary care providers,” notes Eric Bressman, a fellow in the National Clinician Scholars Program and an internist at the University of Pennsylvania medical school. “That is one factor among many that may influence whether a patient is able to make it to a scheduled appointment. It is also one of the ways in which telemedicine might level the playing field in terms of accessing primary care services.”

The full study, “Association of Telemedicine with Primary Care Appointment Access After Hospital Discharge,” was published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. It may be accessed here.

 

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Get the JBHE Weekly Bulletin

Receive our weekly email newsletter delivered to your inbox

Latest News

Study Uncovers Racial Bias in University Admissions and Decision-Making AI Algorithms

A new study has found university admissions and decision-making AI algorithms incorrectly predict academic failure for Black students 19 percent of the time, compared to 12 percent of White students and 6 percent of Asian students.

Donald Comer Named Interim President of Lane College in Tennessee

Dr. Comer has extensive experience as an advocate for HBCUs and African American business education serving on the board of trustees for Stillman College and LeMoyne-Owen College. He will assume his new duties on August 1.

Racial Disparities Found Among Veterans’ Experiences With VA-Funded Community Care

"Community care" provides veterans with an streamlined option to receive VA-funded healthcare through non-VA providers. A new study has found Black Americans are more likely to report negative experiences with community care providers and administrators.

Jeffrey Norfleet Is the New Leader of Shorter College in Arkansas

Dr. Norfleet has been serving as Shorter College's provost and vice president. He has an extensive background in higher education, serving in both academic and administrative capacities.
spot_img

Featured Jobs