Grambling State University to Debut Its New Ph.D. Program in Criminology and Justice Administration

Historically Black Grambling State University in Louisiana is now accepting applications for its new Ph.D. program in criminology and justice administration. It is the first doctoral program of this kind in the state of Louisiana.

The program focuses on the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior while examining the structure of the criminal justice system, its procedures and processes, and how they can work to provide a fair system for all. The 57-hour program contains 21 hours of core courses, 12 hours of research, 12 hours of electives; and 12 hours of dissertation. It will have two areas of concentration: Minorities and Social Injustice Policy, and Justice Policy and Administration. The program will includes instruction in the theory of crime, psychological and social bases of criminal behavior, social value systems and the theory of punishment, criminal law and criminal justice systems, rehabilitation and recidivism, and more.

According to the university, graduates will not only be prepared to work as faculty and researchers, but also as human resource managers, program evaluators, legislators, program trainers, analytical scientists, urban and regional planners, policy analysts, criminologists, mid-and high-level administrators, and managers in agencies involved with the criminal justice system at the local, state, federal and international levels.

Tazinski Lee, interim head of the department of criminal justice, stated that  “Grambling State University’s Ph.D. program provides excellent opportunities to in-service practitioners at senior levels in agencies to improve and upgrade their knowledge bases, analytical skills, and expertise. Specifically, their training, and expertise will be instrumental in the research required to craft groundbreaking public safety policies or consultancy jobs in various organizations.”

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Get the JBHE Weekly Bulletin

Receive our weekly email newsletter delivered to your inbox

Latest News

Three African Americans Appointed to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Roles in Higher Education

The appointments to diversity positions are Tamara Clegg at the University of Maryland, Andrew Alvez at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, and Kendriana Price at the University of Kentucky.

Study Finds Women of Color Author a Disproportionate Share of Banned Books in American Schools

In the 2021-2022 academic year, school and libraries across the country experienced a significant spike in book bans. A new study has found a disproportionate share of these banned books are written by women of color and include characters from diverse backgrounds.

Christopher Davis Appointed President of LeMoyne-Owen College in Memphis

Dr. Davis was appointed interim president of LeMoyne-Owen College last summer. Over the past year, he has led the college through a rebranding initiative, an increase in athletic programming, and improvements to campus infrastructure.

Study Reveals Racial Disparities in Use of Social Security Disability Insurance

According to the report, Black Americans are 1.5 to 2 times more likely to receive Social Security Disability Insurance, and spend roughly 40 percent more on medical care than White Americans.

Featured Jobs