Wesleyan University Creates a New Scholarship Program for African Students

Wesleyan University, the highly selective liberal arts college in Middletown, Connecticut, has announced the establishment of the Wesleyan African Scholars Program. Beginning this fall, the program will welcome a select group of students from Africa each year, providing each with a four-year, 100 percent cost-of-attendance scholarship.

Applications to the program must be citizens or permanent residents of one of Africa’s 54 countries. Individuals with dual U.S. citizenship or who are permanent U.S. residents are not eligible for the program. Only students applying for need-based financial aid and who have demonstrated need will be considered.

Students in the African Scholars Program will be able to take advantage of pre-arrival introductory webinars, peer mentorship, and conference participation. They will also be offered the chance to participate in a unique cross-cultural speakers’ program in which they share aspects of their home culture with the Wesleyan and Middletown communities. Alumni from Africa will be available to them for purposes of networking and mentorship, and there will be opportunities to do internships or post-graduate work in Africa.

Currently, 10 percent of the Wesleyan student body comes from abroad, representing 62 countries. “We embrace the diverse cultures, traditions, and perspectives these students bring to our campus,” said Amin Abdul-Malik Gonzalez, vice president and dean of admission and financial aid at the university. “The African Scholars Program is one more opportunity for students from across the globe to develop the knowledge, intellectual agility, and confidence to tackle a rapidly changing world.”

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