Williams College Cancels a Day of Classes After Racial Incident on Campus

This past Saturday, the phrase “All Niggers Must Die” was found written on a hallway wall on the fourth floor of Prospect Hall at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. The administration acted quickly by notifying local police and holding discussions with students and faculty. Classes and athletic practices were cancelled on Monday. More than a thousand students, faculty, and staff members came together on Chapin Lawn after a student-led march to hear from President Adam Falk and other administrators, as well as students. A slide show of photos from the day of reflection at Williams can be viewed here.

A committee was formed to develop a protocol on how to handle any future incidents of this nature.

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1 COMMENT

  1. Continuing to fascinate a college that a few years back decided they did not need nor should they make any classes mandatory around issues of diversity. Often those who seem not to see what others see become the enclaves of intolerance and the Ivy gets in their eyes … its the trees not the forest sometimes.

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