Morgan State University Teams Up With the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore

MorganHistorically Black Morgan State University in Baltimore has entered into a multiyear partnership with the Walters Art Museum in downtown Baltimore. Under the partnership agreement, the two institutions will co-sponsor art exhibitions, conduct and publish joint research, develop curricula relating to art and museum management, exchange employees for teaching, research, and professional development opportunities, and exchange expertise in the collection, storage, preservation, and exhibition of artwork.

Julia Marciari-Alexander, the Andrea B. and John H. Laporte Director at the Walters Art Museum, stated that “the strategic partnership focuses on opportunities that will benefit both institutions, as well as the diverse citizens of the Baltimore region. Through this unique relationship, we hope to create deep systemic organizational change and have a creative and economic impact on the city.”

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2 COMMENTS

  1. What I find rather ironic and questionable is the overall intent of this agreement from the Walters Art Museum to establish a “partnership” with Morgan State University in 2015. The Walter Art Museum has been in existence since the late 1900s and Morgan State University was created in 1867 [Centenary Biblical Institute (1867–1890), Morgan College (1890–1939), Morgan State College (1939–1975), and Morgan State University (1975-presnt)]. Now, in 2015, the virtually “all White” Board of Directors and “all White” staff at the Walter Art Museum finally decide to partner with Morgan State University espousing this idea for the greater good for all the citizens of Baltimore.

    In fact, most of the personnel from the Walter Arts Museum will conduct themselves in a neocolonial posture while interacting with the students, faculty, and administrators from Morgan State University. Unfortunately this condescending behavior will not be challenged in any capacity Morgan State University administrators, faculty, and definitely no students (not all of course).

    Let’s be honest for moment, students at Morgan State University are being indoctrinated to embrace multiculturalism (actually, White ethnocentricism) via their apolitical, neoliberal, and status quo so-called Black professors who are more concerned about being validated by a White racist system. As a result, the students at Morgan State University are the ones who are being intellectually harmed from being taught by intellectual cowardly professors.

    • You write, “Let’s be honest for moment, students at Morgan State University are being indoctrinated to embrace multiculturalism (actually, White ethnocentricism) via their apolitical, neoliberal, and status quo so-called Black professors who are more concerned about being validated by a White racist system.” Your statement is not correct. I graduated from Morgan State University (MSU) and I was taught to embrace a multicultural society. Moreover, my professors at MSU were not apolitical but political. In addition, I was taught by the history professors at MSU on how to advocate for myself, which I believe that I have done quite well. My professor at MSU were definitely not cowards. I love my MSU experience and I am proud to have been taught by Morgan State University professors from 1996-1998. Go Bears!

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