The University of Hawai’i School of Law Names Camille Nelson as Its Next Dean

Camille Nelson will be the next dean of the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. She will take office on August 1.

In accepting the appointment, Professor Nelson stated that “I’m very much looking forward to working with the law school faculty, students and support staff to continue to build on the amazing foundation and legacy of the Richardson School of Law.”

Since 2015, Professor Nelson has served as dean of the American University Washington College of Law. She previously served as dean of the Suffolk University Law School in Boston from 2010 to 2015. Before joining the faculty at Suffolk University, Professor Nelson taught for nearly a decade at the Saint Louis University School of Law.

Professor Nelson’s scholarship focuses on the intersection of critical race theory and cultural studies, with emphasis on health law, criminal law and procedure, and comparative law. Before entering the academic world, she was a clerk for the Supreme Court of Canada. She was the first Black woman to clerk for Canada’s highest court.

A native of Jamaica, Professor Nelson is a graduate of the University of Toronto and earned a law degree at the University of Ottawa. She also holds a master’s degree in law from Columbia University.

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