American Sociological Association Rejects Efforts to Curtail Teaching of Racial Issues in Schools

The American Sociological Association recently issued a statement on the importance of teaching and learning about race and racism in the nation’s public schools as well as on college and university campuses.

The association strongly rejects efforts by many states to curtail the teaching of courses dealing with race.

“As experts in the study of social life, change, and the causes and consequences of human behavior, sociologists recognize that race is a socially constructed concept, not a biological or natural one,” according to the statement. “We understand race as a dynamic classification system that has been used to create hierarchies and determine access and opportunities for different people based on factors such as color, culture, heritage, and location. Racism — marked by power, domination, and violence — has been pervasive in societies throughout history. Even though formal forms of racism have been outlawed through constitutional amendments and civil rights laws, their impact is still present in economic and political institutions, leading to persistent disparities among racial groups in areas such as criminal justice, education, health, housing, and income.”

The American Sociological Association urges public officials, educators, and lawmakers to avoid suppressing knowledge, violating academic and free speech, and prohibiting scholars and teachers from discussing and teaching about the roles of race and racism in society.

“The prohibition of discussions of race and racism, and related inequalities, disadvantages, and advantages, threatens our democracy more than any education that exposes the causes and practices of building a more just society,” the statement reads.

 

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Get the JBHE Weekly Bulletin

Receive our weekly email newsletter delivered to your inbox

Latest News

North Carolina A&T University Establishes Research Partnership with Collins Aerospace

“There are direct relations to the research we do in the College of Engineering and the mission purpose of Collins Aerospace,” said Stephanie Luster-Teasley, interim dean of the College of Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University. “Being able to partner with Collins really gives our students the opportunities for hands-on research at each level – undergraduate and graduate.”

Andre Johnson Honored for Distinguished Service in Africana Communication

“I am indeed honored to receive this prestigious award named for a person who meant so much to the study of Communication," said Dr. Johnson. “My aim is to continue to serve and work in ways that not only highlight and center Africana communication but also to continue to build on the legacy of Dr. Orlando Taylor.”

Jackson State University Chosen to Participate in Battery Workforce Challenge Program

The Battery Workforce Competition Program will provide students the opportunity to design and build their own electric vehicle battery. Jackson State University was the only historically Black school chosen to participate in the program.

Black Film Project and Film Studies Fellowships Established at Harvard University

Henry Louis Gates Jr., professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, will direct the newly established Black Film Project, an initiative aiming to support independent films focusing on Black history and culture.

Featured Jobs